The Art of Breathing

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Breathing fills the entire being with new strength. The mind gains peace, self-confidence and assurance. Yogi breathing eliminates the impurities from our blood, increases our resistance, stimulates the metabolism and has a particularly great regenerating effect on the endocrine glands. This rejuvenates the entire organism. It is a frequent occurrence that people who exercise rhythmic full breathing consistently for 1 or 2 months, joyously report the disappearance of certain symptoms regarded as signs of old age with which they did not expect improvement.


Rythmic Full Breathing (or Yogic Breathing) is a combination of Abdominal breathing and Thoracic (Chest) breathing.

Execution: standing, sitting or lying down. By means of our consciousness we animate our entire trunk always following the wave-like movement of our inhalation and exhalation. In this way we experience complete equilibrium. Start by exhaling fully. Slowly breathe in through the nose, counting up to eight, and combing lower, middle and upper breathing in a wave-like movement. First, we expand our abdomen, then our ribs and finally we raise our collarbone. At this point our abdominal wall is already drawing in slightly and we begin the exhalation in the same manner as the inhalation, that is, by first drawing in the abdominal wall, then contracting the ribs and finally lowering the shoulders, while we let the air out through the nose. In complete Yogi breathing, the entire breathing mechanism, i.e. the lower, middle and upper lobes of the lungs are in uniform movement. Between the inhalation and the exhalation we can retain our breath for as long is comfortable.

Therapeutic effect: we experience a great feeling of peace. This exercise completely airs the lungs, increases the oxygen and energy supply in the blood, sets up equilibrium between the positive and negative currents, calms the entire nervous system, regulates and slows the activity of the heart, reduces high blood pressure and stimulates digestion.

Mental effect: the calming of the nervous system affects our mental condition. We are filled with a feeling of peace, quiet and security.

Connect to Nature… through Nutrition!

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When we hear the term Ayurveda, our mind automatically sways to spa, massages, body and facial treatments and essential oils… it is much more profound than that and it starts with NUTRITION! 

Ayurveda is one of the most ancient systems of medicine in the world, with its roots reaching back to the 9th century BC. For thousands of years, these teachings were transmitted orally, but were eventually recorded during the Vedic period of ancient India as Sanskrit poetry and compiled into the classic books known as the Four Vedas.

Ayurveda, translated as the “science of life,” is a system of holistic wellness that utilizes various therapies including diet, yoga and herbal preparations to restore harmony and balance within the body.

The principles of Ayurveda are based on the concept of tridosha, “three doshas”. The three doshas, known as Vata, Pitta and Kapha, are dynamic forces with distinct characteristics that shape all things in the universe. In humans, the doshas control all mental, emotional and physical functions and responses, and also determine the state of the soul. They produce natural urges and individual preferences in food. They govern the maintenance and destruction of bodily tissue and the elimination of waste products.

Each person is born with a unique constitution, called prakriti (Sanskrit for “essential nature”), which is composed of varying amounts of influence from each of the three doshas. Each person’s prakriti describes the unique harmony or balance between the doshas that is necessary for that person to experience perfect health.

In the Ayurvedic view, an imbalance between the doshas produces a condition called vikriti, a Sanskrit word that means “deviated from nature.” According to Ayurvedic principles, each individual’s diet should be suited to his or her prakriti. Continue reading

The 5 Tibetan Rites!

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The Five Tibetan Rites: for Healing, Longevity and Rejuvenation.

The five Rites of  Rejuvenation are described extensively in the book ‘Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth’ (1985) by Peter Kelder or in ‘The Eye of Revelation’, as it was originally known (1939). The original “The Eye of Revelation” contains, not only, the original manuscript contents and drawings, but also the Sixth Rite. Buy the eBook or Download.

Tibetan Buddhist monks who lived in a remote and isolated monastery in the Himalayas practiced these five exercises for thousands of years to help them live long and healthy lives… longer than most people can imagine living. The Tibetan Rites can be described as a modified Yoga program. As we know, Yoga is a science that unites body, mind and spirit. Therefore, the rites work on all 3 dimensions of our being… healing body, emotions and mind. They activate and stimulate the seven Chakras (auric body) that in turn stimulate all the glands of the endocrine system (physical body) which is responsible for the body’s overall functioning and aging process. The rites, when performed regularly and on a daily basis, with proper breathing, stimulate the circulation of essential life force energy throughout the body. These rites promote ultimate well-being… a wonderful way to keep your physical body in shape and awaken your mind to experience greater mental alertness during your daily activities. Continue reading